VZBV boss calls for realignment of the Federal Motor Transport Authority

Autobahn, over dts
Autobahn, over dts
As a consequence of the emissions scandal at Volkswagen, Germany's top consumer advocate, Klaus Müller, has called for changes to the tasks of the Federal Motor Transport Authority (KBA).

The fact that the US environmental authority uncovered the manipulation of pollutant emissions five years ago and not the KBA made the deficiencies in market surveillance in Germany visible, said the head of the Federation of German Consumer Organizations (VZBV) in the “Handelsblatt” (Friday edition). "A lot has happened in the last five years, for example market surveillance has been strengthened, testing capacities have been built up and an advisory board has been set up at the Federal Motor Transport Authority, but there is no expansion of the supervisory objectives to include consumer protection."

Overall, Müller drew a mixed balance of the diesel scandal. "With its fraud, Volkswagen not only harmed millions of consumers, but also massively shook confidence in the German auto industry and the Made in Germany brand," said the VZBV boss. “Not only does one remember the greatest economic fraud in German post-war history? but also the stubborn refusal of the group to adequately compensate those affected in Europe. ”The background to this is that Volkswagen had quickly made a generous offer to US customers at the time in order to avoid even higher billions in fines and a flood of lawsuits during the Responsible people in this country have long hesitated to take responsibility. VW had "destroyed a lot of trust", which the entire automotive industry urgently needs to rebuild, according to the VZBV boss. Müller now sees it as the automaker's turn to regain customer confidence that has been lost due to the diesel scandal in order to be prepared for the challenges of the future. "The mobility turnaround that is necessary to cope with the climate crisis can only succeed if consumers switch to modern and efficient cars and trust the new technologies," said the consumer advocate. "People in the dealership must be able to rely on the fact that information on pollutants, consumption and data usage is actually complied with."