The autumn is here…

Fall & Pumpkins
Fall & Pumpkins
Autumn is here ... and with it the rain, the wind and maybe some sunshine to do the golden autumn. Autumn is associated with Thanksgiving, Chestnuts, Grape Harvests - called 'Autumn' in Baden -, flying kites, broom management or brooms, ostriches, wreaths, rädle or crochets, and in recent years Halloween.

... and with it the rain, the wind and maybe some sunshine to do the golden autumn. Autumn is associated with Thanksgiving, Chestnuts, Grape Harvests - called 'Autumn' in Baden -, flying kites, broom management or brooms, ostriches, wreaths, rädle or crochets, and in recent years Halloween.

While the first mentioned terms have been common for years, Halloween only came to Germany from America a few years ago in the course of globalization. The question naturally arises whether Halloween has to be celebrated in Germany?

Let’s take a brief look at how Halloween came about. The oldest reference to the originally pagan festival dates from the 1st century AD. At that time it was still a Celtic festival, which celebrated the end of summer and the arrival of cattle in the domestic stables. In addition, it was believed that on this day the veil between this and the world of the dead would be thin enough that the ghosts can visit you and lit a small candle for them. You put them in your window to take your loved ones home. In order to avert evil spirits, large bonfires, so-called bonfires, were burned on the surrounding hills and disguised, which is also where the custom for scary costumes for Halloween comes from today.

The connection to Samhain's Christianity began when the Christian All Saints Day, which was originally on May 13th and which resulted from the consecration of an ancient Roman temple in honor of the Virgin and All Holy Martyrs in 609 or 610 by Pope Boniface IV, was 100 years old was later moved to November 1st.

The festival 'All Hallows Eve' (All Saints' Day) was celebrated today by Catholic immigrants from Ireland, who also cultivated and expanded their old customs in the USA. From here Halloween spread around 1990 in continental Europe, whereby there are regional differences, especially in the German-speaking countries, because old customs mix with the new ones.

It is up to you whether you want to celebrate Halloween or not.