BP wants to keep petrol stations open in Germany

Petrol pump, over dts
Petrol pump, over dts
The British energy company BP wants to maintain its service station operations in Germany despite its withdrawal from oil and gas production.

If BP sells less and less fuel in the future, gas stations should not die out, said the CEO of the British group, Bernard Looney, of “Welt am Sonntag”. BP operates the largest German Aral branded petrol station network with currently 2.386 stations.

The filling stations are even “central” to BP's new strategy of becoming climate neutral by 2050. "More than 90 percent of the population lives no more than 20 minutes from an Aral gas station," Looney told the newspaper. We will build on that. What is needed, however, is “a complete redefinition of what a gas station is”. As the era of electromobility begins, the BP and Aral stations should in future be responsible for not only selling fuel but also to facilitate the switch to electromobility, sharing models and local public transport and to provide more and more amenities. The mini markets in the stations play an important role here. "In Great Britain, 55 percent of customers only come to the stations for snacks and food, only 25 percent are only there for fuel." In Berlin-Friedrichshain, the group subsidiary Aral has converted a first petrol station into a "mobility hub" as a model project. A “microgrid” with an output of 350 kilowatts ensures that electric cars are charged with batteries, which does not take much longer than filling a car with a combustion engine. In addition to charging stations and battery changing machines for cargo bikes, there are also parking spaces for e-scooters, e-scooters, car sharing and transfer options to bus, underground and suburban train lines. BP announced in the spring that it would reduce its own oil and gas production by 2030 percent by 40. At the same time, investments in renewable energies are to be increased tenfold to five billion US dollars per year. “The awareness that the world has only a limited CO2 budget available has grown everywhere,” said the new BP boss. "The time is now right."