BKA president fears loss of confidence in the police

Bundeskriminalamt, about dts
Bundeskriminalamt, about dts
The President of the Federal Criminal Police Office (BKA), Holger Münch, has warned against a loss of confidence in the police in general in view of the discovery of a suspected right-wing extremist network in the North Rhine-Westphalian police.

"These are incidents that significantly shake confidence in the police," he told the "editorial network Germany" (Thursday editions). The same applies to threatening letters signed with “NSU 2.0” with “obviously previous data inquiries from the police”.

Münch continues: "That is why we, the entire police force in Germany, down to the last service point, have to do everything to maintain trust or to win it back and to say again and again with great clarity: Right-wing extremist ideas and right-wing extremist behavior have no place in the police and wherever they appear, persecuted with all consistency and exhausting all legal means. It is very much to be welcomed that with the immediate suspension of all those involved and the corresponding disciplinary proceedings, a clear signal was set very quickly. ”He is sure that the colleagues in North Rhine-Westphalia will now“ do everything ”to resolve the matter as quickly as possible possible to enlighten. At the BKA there have been "six cases" in the last three years, "most of them" from the group of detective inspector candidates, he added. "In five of the six cases, the incidents led to the termination of the employment relationship, in the sixth case measures under labor law were taken." The behavior of the people concerned "has reached a threshold where we said: We will not tolerate this". And further: “There must be no doubts about our anchoring in the free-democratic basic order and our values. That is the standard that is sufficient for us to separate. "Because the BKA does not want to be" a reflection of the whole of society, but of that part of society that clearly stands for the free, democratic constitutional state. " Overall, right-wing extremism is "the greatest risk for our social coexistence and our democratic order," said the BKA boss to the RND. “Of course, we also see the risks from other areas of politically motivated crime - for example left-wing or religiously motivated crimes. But if you think of Islamist-motivated attacks, for example, these do not lead to the foundations of our society being called into question, we are rather experiencing a convergence. "That looks different with politically motivated crime from the right-wing spectrum. For years, more than half of politically motivated crimes have been committed by the right-wing scene. There is also "a new quality of violence - with three fatal attacks in nine months: the murder of Mr. Lübcke and the attacks in Halle and Hanau" and "further increases in the potential for violence-oriented people", coupled with the "risk of networking and terrorist structures in preparation for the most serious crimes ”. The number of right-wing extremist threats has "more than doubled" in the last year and a half. In his own words, Münch assumes that the number of right-wing extremists who should be viewed as a threat will “continue to rise”.