ADAC test: Every third cycle path too narrow / Club examines cycle routes in ten major cities. Kiel performs best

Bike lane widths in the test: The ADAC examined 120 routes in ten major German cities in a current sample. / Further text via ots and www.presseportal.de/nr/7849 / The use of this image for editorial purposes is free of charge. Publication please citing the source:
Bike lane widths in the test: The ADAC examined 120 routes in ten major German cities in a current sample. / Further text via ots and www.presseportal.de/nr/7849 / The use of this image for editorial purposes is free of charge. For publication, please quote the source: "obs / ADAC" | Image: ADAC

Munich (ots) - In the past few years, no other form of mobility has grown as strongly as bicycle traffic. More and more people are switching to bikes, pedelecs or e-bikes. In a current sample, the ADAC checked whether existing cycle paths could cope with the ever-increasing streams of cycle traffic. The result: every third cycle path is too narrow and does not even meet the minimum standards.

The ADAC examined 120 routes in ten major German cities. The applicable standards for standard and minimum widths, which are specified in the “Recommendations for bicycle traffic facilities” (ERA 2010), served as a yardstick. According to the recommendations, for example, cycle paths that can only be used in one direction should be at least 1,6 meters wide, usually two meters.

In the ADAC test, 36 percent could not even meet the minimum width across all cycle paths. Only every fifth cycle path reached or exceeded the standard widths. Only Kiel achieved a good overall rating. None of the routes on the route failed here, almost half of them were “very good” or “good”. It was different in Mainz and Hanover: both cities failed the test with “poor”. In Mainz, 70 percent of the routes were poor or very poor, in Hanover 58 percent. The other cities in the test (Bremen, Dresden, Erfurt, Munich, Saarbrücken, Stuttgart and Wiesbaden) received the test grade "sufficient".

Wider cycle paths increase safety for the ever-growing cycle traffic. In addition to classic bicycles, wide cargo bikes or trailers and, since last year, e-scooters are also on the German bike paths. "Therefore, in the opinion of the ADAC, when building new cycle paths, attention should be paid to compliance with the standard widths and the minimum width only an exception", ADAC traffic president Gerhard Hillebrand. For much-used cycle paths, width surcharges should also be taken into account when planning, for example to enable vehicles that are wider or of different speeds to be overtaken safely.

Hillebrand: “The concerns of all those involved, such as pedestrians, cyclists, motorists, residents, traders and delivery traffic, must be taken into account. Redistributing the traffic area too quickly, for example through pop-up cycle paths, is not the right means to improve the flow of traffic in the long term and to ensure more safety. "

In addition to bike paths that are often insufficiently wide, the testers also found other disabilities when driving the routes: In some cities, cyclists are hindered by incorrectly parked cars, overgrown plants, trees, masts or poorly placed traffic signs. Here, too, it is up to the cities and municipalities to ensure that cycle paths are freely accessible and to punish violations.

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The text is a press release from ADAC. The text was not edited or changed by our editorial team.